Notable Faculty

Johannes Cocceius

Cornelius van Bynkershoek

Jurist and legal theorist, president of the Supreme Court of the Netherlands

The University of Franeker was made famous for its committed and remarkable professors and faculty members, among which we should mention:

Jean-Nicolas-Sébastien Allamand (1713-1787)

Professor of philosophy (1747-1749); later professor of mathematics and philosophy at the University of Leiden

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Johannes Bogerman (1576-1637)

Professor of theology, president of the Synod of Dort.

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Sebald Justinus Brugmans

Professor of physics and mathematics

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Petrus Camper

Professor of philosophy, anatomy and surgery

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Johannes Cocceius

Professor for Hebrew and theology, 1643

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Johannes van den Driesche

Professor of Oriental languages at Oxford in 1575 and in Franeker in 1585

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Tiberius Hemsterhuis

Professor of Greek and history, 1720–1740

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Ulrik Huber

Professor of law and a political philosopher

Ulrik Huber (1636-94), Dutch jurist. Huber was born at Franeker in Friesland and went to university there, at Utrecht and Heidelberg. In 167 he was appointed professor of eloquence and history at Franeker and in 1665 professor of law. His major work, De jure civitatis, is best known for its discussion of slavery, Huber considers those for whom slavery is justified to include the captives of war, certain convicts, those who voluntarily give up their liberty and the children of female slaves. He also wrote on the concepts of Roman law and collated a summary of Fresian law in 1686. This engraving comes from Huber's Praelectionum juris of 1689.

Theodorus van Kooten

Professor of Latin language and history, poet and politician

Ulrik Huber (1636-94), Dutch jurist. Huber was born at Franeker in Friesland and went to university there, at Utrecht and Heidelberg. In 167 he was appointed professor of eloquence and history at Franeker and in 1665 professor of law. His major work, De jure civitatis, is best known for its discussion of slavery, Huber considers those for whom slavery is justified to include the captives of war, certain convicts, those who voluntarily give up their liberty and the children of female slaves. He also wrote on the concepts of Roman law and collated a summary of Fresian law in 1686. This engraving comes from Huber's Praelectionum juris of 1689.

Johann Samuel König

Professor for mathematics and philosophy, 1744–1749

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Sibrandus Lubbertus

Professor for mathematics and philosophy, 1744–1749

Ulrik Huber (1636-94), Dutch jurist. Huber was born at Franeker in Friesland and went to university there, at Utrecht and Heidelberg. In 167 he was appointed professor of eloquence and history at Franeker and in 1665 professor of law. His major work, De jure civitatis, is best known for its discussion of slavery, Huber considers those for whom slavery is justified to include the captives of war, certain convicts, those who voluntarily give up their liberty and the children of female slaves. He also wrote on the concepts of Roman law and collated a summary of Fresian law in 1686. This engraving comes from Huber's Praelectionum juris of 1689.

 

JSibrandus Lubbertus, professor of theology 1585-1625

Johannes Maccovius, professor of theology in 1615, brother in law of Saskia van Uylenburgh

Henricus Antonides Nerdenus, professor of theology 1585-1614

Adriaan Metius, mathematician and astronomer, professor extraordinarius in 1598

Jacob Perizonius, professor eloquence and history 1682-1693

Herman Alexander Röell, professor of theology

Jean Henri van Swinden, professor of physics and philosophy in 1766

Christiaan Hendrik Trotz, professor of law 1741

Lodewijk Caspar Valckenaer, professor of Greek 1741-1765

Johannes Henricus Voorda, professor of law 1797-1802

Eise Eisinga (1724-1828) amateur astronomer who built the Eise Eisinga Planetarium in his house in Franeker, later became professor of astronomics

Alumni
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Cornelis van Bynkershoek

Cornelis van Bynkershoek, (born May 29, 1673, Middelburg, Zeeland, Neth.—died April 16, 1743, The Hague), Dutch jurist who helped develop international law along positivist lines. Bynkershoek studied law at

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